Law Office of Marc L. Weber

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(949) 543-0800

Law Office of Marc L. Weber

The Law Office of Marc L.Weber provides experienced legal advice and services in the following areas of law:

Business Law:

Commercial law, also known as business law, is the body of law that applies to the rights, relations, and conduct of persons and businesses engaged in commerce, merchandising, trade, and sales. It is often considered to be a branch of civil law and deals with issues of both private law and public law.

Real Estate Law:

Real estate law is the name given to the branch of civil law that covers rights to possess, use, and enjoy land and the permanent man-made additions attached to it. This includes the capacity to hold interests in real property, permissible interests in real property, relations between owners, relations between owners and the community, landlord and tenant relations, the transfer of interests in real property, and real property financing, including deeds and mortgages. Real estate transactions, such as purchases, sales, and leases, are governed by a wide body of federal and state law, and the requirements established by state law often differ from state to state.

Corporate Law:

A business corporation is a for-profit firm that is incorporated or registered under the corporate or company law of a state. The four defining characteristics of the modern corporation are:

[1] Separate legal personality of the corporation (access to tort and contract law in a manner similar to a person) Limited liability of the shareholders (a shareholder’s personal liability is limited to the value of their shares in the corporation) Shares (if the corporation is a public company, the shares are traded on a stock exchange) Delegated management; the board of directors delegates day-to-day management of the company to executives In many developed countries outside of the English speaking world, company boards are appointed as representatives of both shareholders and employees to “codetermine” company strategy.

[2] Corporate law is often divided into corporate governance (which concerns the various power relations within a corporation) and corporate finance (which concerns the rules on how capital is used).

Tax Law, Tax Disputes and Pension Law:

Tax law is a body of rules under which a public authority has a claim on taxpayers, requiring them to transfer to the authority part of their income or property. The power to impose taxes is generally recognized as a right of governments. The tax law of a nation is usually unique to it, although there are similarities and common elements in the laws of various countries.

Franchise Law:

Franchising is the practice of selling the right to use a firm’s successful business model. The word “franchise” is of Anglo-French derivation—from franc, meaning free—and is used both as a noun and as a (transitive) verb. For the franchisor, the franchise is an alternative to building “chain stores” to distribute goods that avoids the investments and liability of a chain. The franchisor’s success depends on the success of the franchisees. The franchisee is said to have a greater incentive than a direct employee because he or she has a direct stake in the business. Essentially, and in terms of distribution, the franchisor is a supplier who allows an operator, or a franchisee, to use the supplier’s trademark and distribute the supplier’s goods. In return, the operator pays the supplier a fee. Thirty three countries—including the United States and Australia—have laws that explicitly regulate franchising, with the majority of all other countries having laws which have a direct or indirect impact on franchising.

Finance, Secured Transactions:

Generally, a secured transaction is a loan or a credit transaction in which the lender acquires a security interest in collateral owned by the borrower and is entitled to foreclose on or repossess the collateral in the event of the borrower’s default. The terms of the relationship are governed by a contract, or security agreement. A common example would be a consumer who purchases a car on credit. If the consumer fails to make the payments on time, the lender will take the car and resell it, applying the proceeds of the sale toward the loan. Mortgages and deeds of trust are another example. In the United States, secured transactions in personal property (that is, anything other than real property) are governed by Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code (U.C.C.). The law treats differently those creditors who are secured (i.e. have an authenticated, perfected security interest) from those creditors who are unsecured. An unsecured creditor is simply a person who is owed money and has not received payment according to the terms of the agreed upon transaction. Upon default of a debtor who has multiple creditors, the distinction between being a secured creditor and an unsecured creditor is legally significant. The secured creditor will generally always have priority to getting his money before the unsecured creditors do. In other words, the unsecured creditor is at the back of the line of priority – his only remedy is to obtain a judgment from the court for the amount of the defaulted loan.

Estate Planning and Probate:

Probate is a legal document. Receipt of probate is the first step in the legal process of administering the estate of a deceased person, resolving all claims and distributing the deceased person’s property under a will. A probate court (surrogate court) decides the legal validity of a testator‘s will and grants its approval by granting probate to the executor. The probated will become a legal instrument that may be enforced by the executor in the law-courts if necessary. A probate also officially appoints the executor (or personal representative), generally named in the will, as having legal power to dispose of the testator’s assets in the manner specified in the testator’s will. However, through the probate process a will may be contested.

Marc L. Weber

Call Now For A Free 20 Minute Consultation
(949) 543-0800